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More people in Spain are enjoying a long retirement

The climate and healthy Mediterranean diet of Spain are just two of the reasons why more people are living to a ripe, old age. Statistics show 15,941 people living to celebrate their 100th birthday in Spain, including 508 people who are 100 years or older in the Alicante region alone.

These figures, produced by the Spanish National Statistics Institute (INE), also show that Spain is home to more than 8.6 million people over the age of 65, including 16,000 centenarians.

Recently, Javea mayor Jose Chulvi joined in the 100th birthday celebrations of resident Maria Codina Rodriguez and her family. However, it’s not just the Spanish who are living longer, as 1,000 centenarians in Spain are foreigners, including 135 British, and 88 Germans.

Undoubtedly, this is great news for expats who can plan for a long retirement. Needless to say, a town with an older population has different needs to a town populated with young families and children. Planners will need to address the baby boomers and the ‘grey pound’ when considering the housing needs of the region or the health care it provides.

This is a situation which should be addressed sooner rather than later, as an Alicante University report ‘Looking Forward to a Dynamic Old Age’ shows that 50 will be the average age of the population in less than 25 years. INE’s figures also show that nearly one in five people in Alicante province are aged over 65, namely 358,435 people out of a population of 1,842,963.

While we should raise a glass of red wine to a long, happy life in Spain, we should also address some of the issues it will raise, such as an increased need for healthcare.

The climate and healthy Mediterranean diet of Spain are just two of the reasons why more people are living to a ripe, old age. Statistics show 15,941 people living to celebrate their 100th birthday in Spain, including 508 people who are 100 years or older in the Alicante region alone.

These figures, produced by the Spanish National Statistics Institute (INE), also show that Spain is home to more than 8.6 million people over the age of 65, including 16,000 centenarians.

Recently, Javea mayor Jose Chulvi joined in the 100th birthday celebrations of resident Maria Codina Rodriguez and her family. However, it’s not just the Spanish who are living longer, as 1,000 centenarians in Spain are foreigners, including 135 British, and 88 Germans.

Undoubtedly, this is great news for expats who can plan for a long retirement. Needless to say, a town with an older population has different needs to a town populated with young families and children. Planners will need to address the baby boomers and the ‘grey pound’ when considering the housing needs of the region or the health care it provides.

This is a situation which should be addressed sooner rather than later, as an Alicante University report ‘Looking Forward to a Dynamic Old Age’ shows that 50 will be the average age of the population in less than 25 years. INE’s figures also show that nearly one in five people in Alicante province are aged over 65, namely 358,435 people out of a population of 1,842,963.

While we should raise a glass of red wine to a long, happy life in Spain, we should also address some of the issues it will raise, such as an increased need for healthcare.

Any more Questions?
We’re here to help

You can contact Golden Leaves at our office in the Avenida del Pla 123-125 in Javea, or Avenida De Almeria 39, local 1, Turre, 04638, Almeria.

You call us on +34 966 493 082 in Spain or visit the website www.glexpatservices.com to ask for more information about health care cover and other issues affecting you as an expat in Spain.

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